Buddy Holly Unplugged.

13524394_1210328419001105_9053302471883597078_nIn a couple weeks I’ll be taking the stage at Crown Centre in Kansas City to perform in A Night On the Town Cabaret series at Musical Theatre Heritage.  The three night stand will explore some highlights from my stage career including Buddy Holly, Hank Williams, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Phil Ochs as well as share some of my own stories and songs. Think Buddy Holly/Zachary Stevenson unplugged.

For tickets and more info, please visit http://www.musicaltheaterheritage.com/

Buddy Holly is alive and well at the Stanley Theatre

Eight shows a week (and a quick trip to see the Jays in Seattle) have kept me very busy as of late.  I figured, at very least, I could share a couple interviews I did recently.  Hope to see you at the Stanley!

Here is an appearance on Vancouver’s Urban Rush:


From the Courier, July 31st:

10 Questions: Buddy-ing actor makes Holly pilgrimage

 

Photo by Dan Toulgoet

By Michael Kissinger, Vancouver Courier

Vancouver audiences know Zachary Stevenson for his Jessie Award-nominated portrayal of Buddy Holly in the Arts Club’s crowd-pleasing Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story, which returns to the Stanley this summer and runs until Aug. 26. But the local rock ’n’ roller is also a talented singer-songwriter, both as a solo artist and as a member of the band the Human Statues. Stevenson took time from his busy schedule to rave on with the Courier and discuss songwriting, eyeware and his likeness to Cee-lo Green.

1. Where does one find proper Buddy Holly glasses?

eBay! Actually, you know, it’s really tough to find really authentic Buddy glasses. They have really strong angles, which few modern dark-rimmed hipster glasses do.

2. Having played Buddy Holly and performed his songs so many times, do you feel your performance has evolved or changed?

Absolutely. When I was first cast as Buddy, I was a shaggy-haired, side-burned hippy coming off a production of Hair. I played a decent folk guitar but had never played blues or rock on an electric. I worked really hard to get it off the ground. Every production since has given me another crack to dig a little deeper and get more detailed. Also working with multiple directors and actors contribute a lot to refining the character as well. A couple of summers ago I finally went down to Lubbock, Texas; Clovis, New Mexico; and Clear Lake, Iowa to do some hands-on research and reflection on the trail of Buddy Holly, which deepened my connection with him. There’s a really cool video my sister made of the trip called “Searching for Buddy Holly” on YouTube.

3. What was it like to actually see in person the towns, recording studios and concert halls portrayed in the production and even perform a song with one of Holly’s backup singers?

Unforgettable. I had already logged over 200 performances of the Buddy Holly Story before I finally was able to head down and see some of the locations that we portray onstage. I’d spent so many hours visualizing these places that it was really surreal to actually be in the presence. It was quite emotional to actually step into that studio floor. I’m not a “spiritual” person per se. But I could really feel the presence of energy and the vibrations that Buddy and the boys had caused in those walls all those years ago.

4. How has playing Buddy Holly influenced your own songwriting?

Editing. Most of Buddy Holly’s songs are not much longer than two minutes. No self-indulgence here. Helps me to edit anything that is extraneous to the song.

5. Your recently released album Smashed Hits consists of covers of Buddy Holly songs and other early rock ’n’ roll classics, and the album art looks of that time period. What about that era of music appeals to you?

I love how exciting it was for people to hear new songs on the radio. How there was a lot of mystery about the performers. That people gathered ’round the record player and listened to music and treated it with more reverence and focus. We consume so much music now on the go and with visuals on the Internet. A lot of pop music has become a little like fast food.

6. You’ve played Phil Ochs, Hank Williams, Jerry Lee Lewis, Elvis Presley and Buddy Holly on stage. Which one is the hardest to play?

Jerry Lee was. Mostly because I’m not a natural Boogie-Woogie player so it took A LOT of practice to give up to a performable level. I think I naturally share more in common, personality-wise, with the other guys, too.

7. What modern day musician do you think you’d be best suited to portray?

How ’bout Cee-lo Green? A lot of people have said I look like Chris Isaac but I’d love to be Ben Gibbard of Death Cab for Cutie (one of my fav bands).

8. Have you ever suffered any Buddy Holly-related injuries?

Haha. Just last night I sliced up my finger pretty good on a broken string.

9. What kind of music do you listen to when you’re at home?

I listen to a lot of different styles. I just bought Hey Ocean’s latest album. It’s really good.

10. I assume there are times when you must get tired of playing the same songs night after night. What is the key to warding off Buddy Holly exhaustion?

The look in an older lady’s eyes as she tells me how she couldn’t keep still during the performance and how much it meant to her to hear those songs that flooded her with memories of her youth. It reminds me of the power of music and why I love it so much. Though, I may not wake up every morning thinking “I can’t wait to play ‘Peggy Sue’ yet again tonight!” I do go to bed every night thankful I did.

mkissinger@vancourier.com

Thank you to all who purchased “Smashed Hits”

Thank you to all who bought a copy of my disc “Smashed Hits” last year which includes covers of Buddy Holly, Jerry Lee Lewis and Hank Williams. I was able to sell enough to make a $2000 donation to MSF (Doctors Without Borders) this year.
I’ll be selling copies again this Spring when I take “Hank Williams: The Show He Never Gave” to Saskatoon!

Making my contribution

Dead Ringer in Surrey

Via Surrey Now:  One dead ringer for several dead singers

On stage at Surrey Arts Centre; Zachary Stevenson best known for becoming Buddy Holly in Arts Club’s hit musical about doomed rocker

By Adrian Chamberlain, Surrey Now

The Buddy Holly Story. Shot by Tim Matheson

Zachary Stevenson plugs in again for Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story, on stage at Surrey Arts Centre until Oct. 28.

Need help bringing a dead singing star to life?

Call Zachary Stevenson.

The actor-singer once starred in a show about protest singer Phil Ochs. He’s also portrayed country icon Hank Williams on stage.

But Stevenson is best known for becoming Buddy Holly.

“I’ve cornered the market as an actor, playing singers who have untimely deaths who wrote songs and played guitar,” said Stevenson with a smile.

For an interview, Stevenson wore the same prescription horn-rims he sports in Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story, which on Tuesday (Oct. 11) opened a two-week run at Surrey Arts Centre’s main stage.

Stevenson, who ordinarily plays acoustic guitar, straps on an electric to play the rocker who wrote “Peggy Sue” and “That’ll Be the Day.” His uncanny imitation and persona of the doomed rocker landed him the plum role with the Arts Club Theatre Company production.

“I initially was approached to perform in the full musical in Ontario,” said the 29-year-old. “I researched him, the era and his music.”

Stevenson has spent hours pouring over the Internet, reading about the legendary singer and hearing his music.

“I was very meticulous in the smallest of details about Buddy Holly because I wanted to capture his essence,” he said.

“As far as looking like him, I wear glasses and have curly hair myself, so that helps.”

Last year, Stevenson was chosen as one of the Vancouver Sun’s “10 Rising Talents to Watch for in the Arts.” According to the Sun’s arts critic, Peter Birnie, the young singer has: ” … mastered a mimicry of some interesting singers, and it’s paid off.”

Birnie also went on to say this about his role in Buddy: “Zachary Stevenson nails the rock ‘n’ roll legend in a full-throttle tribute that fires on all cylinders.”

After performing Holly on stage in a half-dozen productions across Canada, the lanky actor/singer has mastered Holly’s vocal inflections.

“I really trained on his accent marks in the lyrics so I could get all the hiccups down-pat before the first show,” he added. “I polish my performance every time and it feels more and more natural. Now, I can step on stage and be Buddy.”

He went on to add that: “Although Buddy’s songs were simple, he didn’t follow the typical rock formula of the times. His music is timeless because of that rock ‘n’ roll spirit he portrayed. He had a lot of energy on stage.”

Stevenson said he never set out to mimic deceased music legends. While at the University of Victoria studying for a theatre degree, the budding performer developed a one-man show about Phil Ochs, an obscure American protest singer who committed suicide in 1976 at the age of 35.

Stevenson spent endless hours listening to Ochs albums in his father’s record collection.

“I’d sit in my house in Parksville and play the record and play along, trying to figure out his picking pattern,” he said.

Meanwhile, Stevenson said the hits that made Buddy Holly a household name get everyone in the audience up on their feet and dancing.

“Everybody also starts singing,” he said. “It is so much fun for me to see the audience get into the music as much as I do.

“Some of the younger audience has told me it’s the closest they’ll get to seeing Buddy Holly perform, and the older crowd tell me they get energized and they tell me they have great memories of that era.? As long as people keep wanting the music, I’ll keep performing it.”

Stevenson has found success playing his own music as well, with folk-pop duo The Human Statues. “I guess you can describe our music as influenced primarily by early pop like The Beatles, but with a modern twist,” he said. “We are often compared to the Barenaked Ladies … but we aren’t a novelty act.”

As for playing another deceased music legend, well, Stevenson certainly isn’t averse to the idea.

“People say ‘who’s next?’ And I say I don’t know. Jimi Hendrix? I don’t know if I can pull that one off.”

with file from Richmond News

TICKET INFO:

‘BUDDY’ AT SURREY ARTS CENTRE Tickets range from $29 to $48 for Buddy:

The Buddy Holly Story at Surrey Arts Centre’s main stage, from Oct. 11-28 (select dates). For show and ticket info, call 604-501-5566 or visit www.surrey.ca/arts.
© Copyright (c) Surrey Now

Read more.

Buddy is Brought Back to Life

Via the Cowichan Valley Citizen

Buddy is brought back to life

  • By Lexi Bainas, The Citizen May 25, 2011

His face is well known to a Cowichan Valley crowd but music lovers might not know his name right away.

He’s Zachary Stevenson and he’s been honing his ability to mimic well known performers for several years, often using Valley venues such as the Mercury Theatre and Ryder’s Roadhouse to polish his acts.

He appeared some years back in The Ballad of Phil Ochs and only a few years ago started to work on the astonishing tribute to Buddy Holly that has led to important gigs in Vancouver and a packed house at the Cowichan Theatre May 10 when he headlined in Duncan with the Legends of Rock & Roll showcase.

Stevenson is working hard at presenting the whole Buddy Holly, taking the famous performer far beyond the writer of iconic ’50s hits that were beloved by such later groups as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones but bringing out the part of his work that underpinned the rock music we know today.

Stevenson has actually visited Holly’s old studio and stood behind the microphone the pop idol used to record his hits and this extra work is paying off in additional reality.

The show in Duncan May 10 also featured Bill Culp as the Big Bopper and Ben Kunder as Ritchie Valens respectively, creating a concert line-up similar to the famous “Winter Dance Party” tour that ended in tragedy in 1959 when they were all killed in a plane crash.

Rolling down the blogging lanes.

Rolling into my 30s

Here I am.  It’s late January.  And I’m ready to strike!  Not only with a big orange ball.  But on the blogging lanes.

I play music.  I write music.  I do plays.  If you enjoy these things, perhaps you’ll enjoy this site.

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